SOME EARLY 1986 PAINTER’S CONSIDERATIONS ON HIS ACRYLICS ON DRESSED CARDBOARD AND FABRIANO PAPERS

 
As the cardboard merges with the solid coloured shapes of the painting it gives hold to, its sensitive texture is brought to life not only through them but also and at the same time by the structural latticed paths left untouched in their midst.

The sheer whiteness of the paper encompasses the shapes it slices through and makes more vibrant yet the whole of the area they span through with a pulsating rythmic upsurge. The gesture can now lead a life of its own, aiming at higher goals, within the boundaries of its writing where it hinges on itself to finally settle between the latticed stripes and the bulk of the varied shapes.

At the same time and in a similar way, the colours are made alive according to the rythm of the overall structure they draw their shapes from, the outcome of which gives birth to a musical feeling as if surging from the staff of time… A total alchemy now pervades everything as the formal poetry of the dream is brought about by the almost magical ability to keep the light enclosed within this framework.

Beyond artistic technicalities, accurate craftmanship and work of nature, the whole of the painting is a love song, an Ode to Beauty : it now achieves the performance of an absolute harmony. It enjoys one of the distinctive features of art, that is the timeless wanderings the eye is enticed by to its exultation.

Out of the clayish tones in their midst, an emerging nocturnal presence is about to take off and, once again, the shades of them it boards sail within the silence of a loneliness that streams towards the so very dense cosmic universe of an imaginary world. Instead of being an illustration of it, everything according to the span and sideview of this structured world endlessly takes shape. The absolute magic spell of far away places pours in… I stand in awe, listening to their rythms. I stand in awe, overwhelmed by the music that prompts me to love, to love along the lines I have to give way to as a painter.

Jean-Paul Jérôme 86